photo of a student

Field-based student learning programs are an excellent way for students to experience and learn through hands-on activities. These programs allow students to immerse themselves in real-life situations and apply theoretical knowledge to practical situations.

However, program administrators and instructors must determine and evaluate metrics to measure these programs’ success. Here are three measurable metrics they can use.

Student Engagement

Student engagement refers to the degree to which students show interest and actively participate in the learning process. It’s a telling indicator of how much students gain from their field experiences.

Students’ engagement level often directly correlates with the quality of the field-based student learning programs. When students are genuinely engaged, they’re more likely to grasp complex concepts and develop critical thinking skills.

Field-based programs provide a unique platform for students to participate actively – encouraging them to ask questions, explore, and make discoveries independently. Engagement could manifest as enthusiastic participation in tasks, willingness to take on challenges, or persistent exploration of the subject matter.

For example, if students work on an environmental conservation project, they might actively engage by suggesting innovative ways to reduce waste or finding creative solutions for sustainability. Here, students are not merely passive receivers of information but are active participants in constructing their knowledge.

To evaluate student engagement in field-based programs, instructors can use a combination of methods such as pre-and post-program surveys, observations, and interviews. These can help measure students’ level of involvement before and after attending the program.

Evaluation can also involve tracking participation rates and positive attitudes toward learning the subject. Surveys and questionnaires are also great ways to gather quantitative data on students’ engagement levels for statistical analysis.

Knowledge Retention

The primary objective of any learning program is to impart knowledge. Field-based student learning programs offer a unique opportunity for students to apply theoretical concepts in real-life situations, making it easier to retain the information. This hands-on approach allows students to connect with the material in a more memorable and applicable way.

For instance, marine biology students will develop a deeper understanding of the subject after participating in a guided field trip to the ocean to witness firsthand the biodiversity, adaptations, and interactions between different species – making it easier for them to make connections and retain new knowledge.

To evaluate knowledge retention, instructors can use pre- and post-program assessments or quizzes. These tests can be designed to assess specific learning objectives and compare students’ performance before and after attending the program.

Additionally, instructors can use concept maps or reflective writing exercises to assess how well students have integrated the newly acquired knowledge with their existing understanding of the subject. Some programs also include follow-up assessments a few months after the program to determine long-term retention.

Skill Development

Field-based student learning programs not only focus on imparting knowledge but also aim to develop practical skills in students. These skills range from basic scientific techniques to communication, teamwork, and problem-solving skills. Unlike traditional classroom settings, field-based learning allows students to apply these skills in real-world situations – giving them a chance to develop and refine them.

For example, a field trip to an archaeological site can help students learn practical skills such as excavation techniques, artifact identification, and data collection. At the same time, they also have the opportunity to work collaboratively with their peers and practice communicating their findings in a way that is accessible to a broader audience.

Evaluating skill development in field-based programs can include assessing students’ competency in specific techniques, analyzing their group dynamics and communication skills, and observing their problem-solving abilities.

Instructors can also gather feedback from students through surveys or self-reflection tasks to evaluate how they perceive their growth in these areas. This data can provide valuable insights into the program’s effectiveness in developing students’ practical skills that they’ll need for future academic or career pursuits.


If you need to evaluate the success of your on-field learning programs, Tevera is ready to help. Contact us today to learn how we can support your program evaluation needs and improve the overall success of your field-based learning initiatives.

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photo of a student

Field-based student learning programs are an excellent way for students to experience and learn through hands-on activities. These programs allow students to immerse themselves in real-life situations and apply theoretical knowledge to practical situations.

However, program administrators and instructors must determine and evaluate metrics to measure these programs’ success. Here are three measurable metrics they can use.

Student Engagement

Student engagement refers to the degree to which students show interest and actively participate in the learning process. It’s a telling indicator of how much students gain from their field experiences.

Students’ engagement level often directly correlates with the quality of the field-based student learning programs. When students are genuinely engaged, they’re more likely to grasp complex concepts and develop critical thinking skills.

Field-based programs provide a unique platform for students to participate actively – encouraging them to ask questions, explore, and make discoveries independently. Engagement could manifest as enthusiastic participation in tasks, willingness to take on challenges, or persistent exploration of the subject matter.

For example, if students work on an environmental conservation project, they might actively engage by suggesting innovative ways to reduce waste or finding creative solutions for sustainability. Here, students are not merely passive receivers of information but are active participants in constructing their knowledge.

To evaluate student engagement in field-based programs, instructors can use a combination of methods such as pre-and post-program surveys, observations, and interviews. These can help measure students’ level of involvement before and after attending the program.

Evaluation can also involve tracking participation rates and positive attitudes toward learning the subject. Surveys and questionnaires are also great ways to gather quantitative data on students’ engagement levels for statistical analysis.

Knowledge Retention

The primary objective of any learning program is to impart knowledge. Field-based student learning programs offer a unique opportunity for students to apply theoretical concepts in real-life situations, making it easier to retain the information. This hands-on approach allows students to connect with the material in a more memorable and applicable way.

For instance, marine biology students will develop a deeper understanding of the subject after participating in a guided field trip to the ocean to witness firsthand the biodiversity, adaptations, and interactions between different species – making it easier for them to make connections and retain new knowledge.

To evaluate knowledge retention, instructors can use pre- and post-program assessments or quizzes. These tests can be designed to assess specific learning objectives and compare students’ performance before and after attending the program.

Additionally, instructors can use concept maps or reflective writing exercises to assess how well students have integrated the newly acquired knowledge with their existing understanding of the subject. Some programs also include follow-up assessments a few months after the program to determine long-term retention.

Skill Development

Field-based student learning programs not only focus on imparting knowledge but also aim to develop practical skills in students. These skills range from basic scientific techniques to communication, teamwork, and problem-solving skills. Unlike traditional classroom settings, field-based learning allows students to apply these skills in real-world situations – giving them a chance to develop and refine them.

For example, a field trip to an archaeological site can help students learn practical skills such as excavation techniques, artifact identification, and data collection. At the same time, they also have the opportunity to work collaboratively with their peers and practice communicating their findings in a way that is accessible to a broader audience.

Evaluating skill development in field-based programs can include assessing students’ competency in specific techniques, analyzing their group dynamics and communication skills, and observing their problem-solving abilities.

Instructors can also gather feedback from students through surveys or self-reflection tasks to evaluate how they perceive their growth in these areas. This data can provide valuable insights into the program’s effectiveness in developing students’ practical skills that they’ll need for future academic or career pursuits.


If you need to evaluate the success of your on-field learning programs, Tevera is ready to help. Contact us today to learn how we can support your program evaluation needs and improve the overall success of your field-based learning initiatives.

photo of a student

Field-based student learning programs are an excellent way for students to experience and learn through hands-on activities. These programs allow students to immerse themselves in real-life situations and apply theoretical knowledge to practical situations.

However, program administrators and instructors must determine and evaluate metrics to measure these programs’ success. Here are three measurable metrics they can use.

Student Engagement

Student engagement refers to the degree to which students show interest and actively participate in the learning process. It’s a telling indicator of how much students gain from their field experiences.

Students’ engagement level often directly correlates with the quality of the field-based student learning programs. When students are genuinely engaged, they’re more likely to grasp complex concepts and develop critical thinking skills.

Field-based programs provide a unique platform for students to participate actively – encouraging them to ask questions, explore, and make discoveries independently. Engagement could manifest as enthusiastic participation in tasks, willingness to take on challenges, or persistent exploration of the subject matter.

For example, if students work on an environmental conservation project, they might actively engage by suggesting innovative ways to reduce waste or finding creative solutions for sustainability. Here, students are not merely passive receivers of information but are active participants in constructing their knowledge.

To evaluate student engagement in field-based programs, instructors can use a combination of methods such as pre-and post-program surveys, observations, and interviews. These can help measure students’ level of involvement before and after attending the program.

Evaluation can also involve tracking participation rates and positive attitudes toward learning the subject. Surveys and questionnaires are also great ways to gather quantitative data on students’ engagement levels for statistical analysis.

Knowledge Retention

The primary objective of any learning program is to impart knowledge. Field-based student learning programs offer a unique opportunity for students to apply theoretical concepts in real-life situations, making it easier to retain the information. This hands-on approach allows students to connect with the material in a more memorable and applicable way.

For instance, marine biology students will develop a deeper understanding of the subject after participating in a guided field trip to the ocean to witness firsthand the biodiversity, adaptations, and interactions between different species – making it easier for them to make connections and retain new knowledge.

To evaluate knowledge retention, instructors can use pre- and post-program assessments or quizzes. These tests can be designed to assess specific learning objectives and compare students’ performance before and after attending the program.

Additionally, instructors can use concept maps or reflective writing exercises to assess how well students have integrated the newly acquired knowledge with their existing understanding of the subject. Some programs also include follow-up assessments a few months after the program to determine long-term retention.

Skill Development

Field-based student learning programs not only focus on imparting knowledge but also aim to develop practical skills in students. These skills range from basic scientific techniques to communication, teamwork, and problem-solving skills. Unlike traditional classroom settings, field-based learning allows students to apply these skills in real-world situations – giving them a chance to develop and refine them.

For example, a field trip to an archaeological site can help students learn practical skills such as excavation techniques, artifact identification, and data collection. At the same time, they also have the opportunity to work collaboratively with their peers and practice communicating their findings in a way that is accessible to a broader audience.

Evaluating skill development in field-based programs can include assessing students’ competency in specific techniques, analyzing their group dynamics and communication skills, and observing their problem-solving abilities.

Instructors can also gather feedback from students through surveys or self-reflection tasks to evaluate how they perceive their growth in these areas. This data can provide valuable insights into the program’s effectiveness in developing students’ practical skills that they’ll need for future academic or career pursuits.


If you need to evaluate the success of your on-field learning programs, Tevera is ready to help. Contact us today to learn how we can support your program evaluation needs and improve the overall success of your field-based learning initiatives.